Strategic Housing Land Use Availability Assessment (SHLAA) sites

These are personal notes, written in November 2018, by Roger Keyes, head of the Perranzabuloe NDP Housing Group on the question.

Following the flurry of interest in the Perranporth map (screen shot of the CC Perranporth SHLAA map below) of  Strategic Housing Land Use Availability Assessment (SHLAA) sites referred to at the Perranporth meeting of the NDP group on the 21st of November 2018, it might be helpful to give any concerned residents further information to clarify what a SHLAA site is, and is not.  There are no SHLAA sites, to my knowledge, in other areas of Perranzabuloe that have not already gone on to receive planning permission.

Cornwall Council’s information on this is very helpful:

“The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) requires all Local Authorities to carry out Strategic Housing Land Use Availability Assessment as part of the evidence base for the Local Plan.

Cornwall Council has prepared and regularly updates SHLAA to support the Cornwall Local Plan. The SHLAA is a technical document that identifies sites across Cornwall which shows initial potential for providing 10 or more new homes. The SHLAA automatically excludes sites which are:

  1. Not connected to a settlement within the Settlement Hierarchy.
  2. Within a designated Special Area of Conservation, Special Protection Area and/or Site of Special Scientific Interest.
  3. Within Flood Zone 3b.

Sites are largely included in the SHLAA on the basis of a broad-brush desktop assessment which means that their inclusion in the SHLAA does not imply that they would necessarily be granted planning permission or are suitable for allocation for residential use. Nevertheless, with the vast majority of the sites having been put forward by the landowners, it is a good guide to what sites are available. The SHLAA also provides an indication of how many homes could be delivered and when, based on input from the landowners, density calculations and typical build-out rates.”

From:  Cornwall Council Neighbourhood Planning Guidance Note: Housing Land Availability Assessment

Key points are stated very clearly in another document available online (cornwall-shlaa-report-january-2016 – the most recent version as far as I know):

“Box 1: Status of the Cornwall SHLAA Report and Identified Sites

The Cornwall SHLAA is not a planning decision making document. It makes broad assumptions in terms of site suitability in order to bring forward a wide range of sites for consideration of housing potential. Sites that are identified in the Cornwall SHLAA would be required to be further tested by the planning application or allocation processes including consideration of sustainability and planning criteria, development plan policies and consultation before they could be deemed suitable in planning terms.

In summary:

  • The SHLAA is not development plan policy;
  • The SHLAA does not indicate that sites will be granted planning permission;
  • The SHLAA does not preclude sites from being developed for other suitable uses; and
  • The SHLAA is an important evidence base technical document but is not a planning decision making document.

The SHLAA does not preclude other sites which have not been submitted or assessed during this process from coming forward for housing.

The web page on Cornwall Council’s site gives further information and links, including where to find the original version of the map presented here: https://www.cornwall.gov.uk/environment-and-planning/planning/planning-policy/adopted-plans/evidence-base/strategic-housing-land-availability-assessment/

Note dated November 23rd 2018

2018-05-10 Parish Council & SWW Meeting Notes

Parish Council & South West Water

Meeting Notes

10th May 2018

The Parties:

South West Water (SWW) Represented by:

Perry Hobbs – Head of Strategic Investment Planning Richard Behan – Flood Risk Manager
Ian McFerlane – Customer Services and Network Manager

Perranzabuloe Parish Council

(PC) Councillor Steve Arthur Councillor Karen Colam

Councillor William Rogers

Perranzabuloe Neighbourhood Plan (NDP)

Rory Jenkins

Kevin Havill

Background:
The meeting had been arranged by William Rogers as a chance for both the PC and NDP understand more about the issues facing SWW to deliver its responsibilities for waste water collection and treatment. Whether the current infrastructure is sufficient, what improvements are necessary and whether there is capacity to collect and treat more particularly if there is to be more residential development in the parish.

All parties were aware of problems including flooding of Thywanhale Square and overloading of the pumping station on Station Road.

The PC and NDP explained that clean sea and stream water all year round is vital for safety and amenity of visitors and all year round residents alike. The local economy is largely built on tourism with the beach and water sport as the central theme. Many residents have chosen the area because of the landscape and lifestyle. Awareness to environmental issues is growing illustrated by the popular designation of the Perranporth as a plastic free zone.

Responsibilities:
SWW explained that responsibilities for the flooding management collection of foul and surface water are split between:
Environment Agency – Sea and rivers
Cornwall Council (highways) – Highways
SWW – Sewers, surface water from hardstanding within the curtilage of properties
Defra – A government regularity authority with responsibilities to monitor water and sea water quality including The Bathing Water Directive

System:
Perranporth – Surface Water and sewerage drains to the pumping station on Station Road from where it is pumped to Droskyn, then to a treatment works at Cligga and with a discharge of treated water into the sea.
Goonhavern – Has its own treatment works and the treated water discharge goes into streams.

The historic network was built in the anticipation that rain water would dilute effluent before it being run into the sea. The Clean Sweep policy introduced 18 years ago has been built on the basis that raw waste should not enter the rivers or sea but be treated first.

Problems arise primarily because water enters the SWW system from surface run off such as highways (which could be discharged into streams and rivers – for example Station Road) and from historic mine shafts and addits (for example Thywanhale Square). These extraordinary loads stretch the pumping station in Perranporth beyond its capacity and can cause outflows of untreated effluent. SWW has permits for a limited number of Combined Sewage Outflows (CSOs) at designated points and has obligations to both report incidents to the Environment Agency and monitor water quality on a continuous basis.

For new development it is now theoretically required that surface water does not flow offsite into the sewerage system thereby reducing the volumes pumped to treatment works. The historic network remains though and Cornwall Council did not take the opportunity to rectify local problems on Station Road from highway run off when the Environment Agency undertook flood management works a few years ago. In terms of new developments, these often manage to present a case that allows them to not deal with surface water onsite, but discharge it into the existing system.

Specific problems around Bolenna Park and Hendrawna Lane were discussed and SWW will investigate further.

The tankering of waste from Station Road to Droskyn over the recent winter had been as a response to the broken main between the two locations on St Georges Hill. This main has now been repaired.

Planning Process
SWW explained that are not a statutory consultee in the planning process. They are consulted but their views can be overruled. The grant of planning permission gives property owns the right to connect and SWW are obliged to provide service irrespective of whether their infrastructure is adequate.

All the respective agencies hold duty of care responsibilities and issues arising from the historic networks along the North Coast are well known. A long term Drainage and Waste Water Plan is being compiled and to cover a future 25 year period, however, this plan won’t be ready until 2022.

The PC and NDP expressed the view that a large, probably majority, proportion of residents would like to prevent further development because of inadequacies in the current infrastructure. SWW responded that in their experience using capacity problems to halt development rarely works in the long term. However they were keen to promote that the NDP include policies to tackle all drainage issues with future development targets to be linked to completed improvements.

In short the Perranporth pumping and treatment works could support future development IF there was proper separation of surface run off from household waste as could Goonhavern to a lessor extent but which benefits from an easier topography.

An example of a multi authority agreement known as Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Llanelli was discussed. Under this agreement developers are required to make provision for the removal of storm water from the system before new foul water is introduced. This model could be on a 1:1 or possibly a 2:1 ratio basis.

Funding for improvements works could come from the following sources:
Central Government – Flooding and Coastal Defence Projects Community Infrastructure Levy – Cornwall Council

Highways – Cornwall Council

Next Steps
SWW water to provide more information of the Llanelli MOU and to investigate further problems at Bolenna and Hendrawna
SWW to revert on why the spill alert system only works during the bathing season and not year round.
PC to discuss
NDP to develop draft policies for community feedback

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